Crawford UD12 Burns

By Matt McGrain on March 1, 2014
Crawford UD12 Burns
Burns faces the possibility that he might not be good enough for the international scene.

I think I would like to see the inexperienced Crawford, who climbs to 23-0, next time out regardless of who the opponent might be…

Ricky Burns refused to use the brutally broken jaw he suffered at the hands of Ray Beltran in the controversial draw they boxed last year as an excuse for performance either before or after the fight, but he certainly looked gun-shy—he was also absolutely outclassed across the board by an American visitor who was momentarily perturbed by the extremely hostile Scottish crowd, but was at no time was perturbed by the man ranked #4 at lightweight by the Transnational Boxing Board and certainly has enhanced his own #6 ranking with a performance of near total domination.

Lustily booed to the ring, Terence Crawford looked a picture of relaxed confidence at the top of the ramp but rather troubled by the time he stood ring-center, saluting the baying mass. Burns, predictably, was roared to the ring by a throbbing SECC in Glasgow, Scotland and the combination resulted in Burns grabbing the second round from a pensive Crawford—the one and only round I scored for him during what was an extremely difficult night for Ricky Burns.

Crawford was faster, better on the inside, far more cohesive, punching to body and head with real depth of strategy, mixing shoe-shining with legitimately hard punches with numbing regularity, most especially on the rare occasions when Burns had some momentary success. Switch-hitting, moving well and never forgetting to punch once the nerves inevitable on the biggest night of his career had dissipated, Crawford looked two classes above the Scottish strap-holder.

Having clutched ring-center to his chest in the third making the American look momentarily troubled, Burns rescinded that advantage at every turn, covering up and retreating or clutching on many of the numerous occasions upon which he was hurt, giving the sniper in front of him ample opportunity for splitting and cornering the high-guard Burns relied upon to protect himself.

Originally a little uncertain with the southpaw portion of his attack, Crawford warmed to this tool most noticeably and became extremely adept at dropping the trailing left over his opponent’s left jab, a jab that seemed in the first two rounds like it might be a punch intrinsic to troubling Crawford. Solved, as completely as any punch ever has been, by the tenth, his dominance had become something rather dull. A genuine attempt to stop the recipient of that famously lucky draw against Beltran last year in the twelfth was understandable from a tactical point of view and brought real excitement to the closing seconds, but Burns, for all that his flaws were ruthlessly exposed here tonight, is teak tough and will not be stopped by a puncher of Crawford’s limited power.

Official scorecards reading 117-111 and 116-112 twice, flattered the Scot a little in my opinion but the right man won and that should be good enough for everybody. Impressively, Burns afterwards indicated his favored next move is a rematch with Crawford, and equally impressive was Crawford’s apparent acquiescence to the idea. There may be bigger fights out there for Crawford who looked, at times, like a poor prototype for Pernell Whitaker. He is nowhere near the Sweet Pea class—who is?—but he has a slick style, a great engine, an excellent chin and a good defense.

I, personally, could do without seeing the rematch but I think I would like to see the inexperienced Crawford, who climbs to 23-0, next time out regardless of who the opponent might be.

For Burns (who drops to 36-3-1) it’s the drawing board. Probably too good for the British scene, he faces the bleak possibility that he might not be good enough for the international scene. The next two contests he engages in may define his career.

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TERENCE CRAWFORD POST FIGHT INTERVIEW WITH iFL TV / BURNS v CRAWFORD



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  1. kid vegas 04:38pm, 03/02/2014

    Respect to Crawford for fighting this guy in Glasgow

  2. vcam 04:07am, 03/02/2014

    BURNS SHOULD COME TO AMERICA, GET A NEW TRAINER LIKE LENNOX LEWIS, STEVE COLLINS, NIGEL BENN, AND AMIR KHAN AND A HOST OF OTHERS.
    THE BRITISH SIDE OF HIS DEVELOPMENT HAS BEEN REACHED AND WILL GROW NO MORE.. BUT, HE CAn DEFINITELY GET BETTER.

  3. raxman 06:14pm, 03/01/2014

    ted - yes i could never understand why he isn’t thought of more highly. granted this is his first step up to top tier opponents but since when that his a reason for a talented fighter not to be hyped. maybe its because he boxes his way to ko victories (or gets the journeyman/gate keepers by UD) rather than blitzing them. anyway its only up for him now. he should go after vasquez quick smart. or gamboa. a loss to either guy wouldn’t be his end, yet a win could push him into contention for a payday fight vs one of the names at 140.
    as for burns - i get the impression that these past years fighting in glasgow have been very good for his bank balance. he should take his money and run - coz he has definitely lost something.

  4. Ted 04:52pm, 03/01/2014

    Crawford has the goods

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