Devon Alexander vs. Aron Martinez

By Robert Ecksel on October 14, 2015
Devon Alexander vs. Aron Martinez
Alexander the Great hasn’t looked great of late. Devon has lost two of his last three fights.

Tonight on ESPN, former two-division champion Devon Alexander, from St. Louis, gets it on with Aron Martinez, from East LA…

Tonight at the Gila River Arena in Glendale, Arizona, in a fight televised live on ESPN (9 PM ET/6PM PT), former two-division champion Devon Alexander (26-3, 14 KOs), from St. Louis, Missouri, gets it on with Aron Martinez (19-4-1, 4 KOs), from East Los Angeles by way of Uruapan, Michoacán de Ocampo, Mexico.

In the co-main event, IBF World featherweight champion Lee Selby (21-1, 8 KOs), from Barry, Wales, United Kingdom, will be making his U.S. debut against former three-division champion Fernando Montiel (54-4-2, 39 KOs), from Los Mochis, Sinaloa, Mexico.

Alexander the Great hasn’t looked great of late. A former world champion at 140 and 147 pounds, the 28-year-old has lost two of his last three fights, to Shawn Porter in 2013 and Amir Khan in 2014, and three of his last eight. Victories over Marcos Maidana in 2011 and Lucas Matthysse in 2012 somewhat offset his recent setbacks, but he needs a win if he hopes to get another title shot.

“This camp has been all about getting things right,” says Alexander. “I had to make sure my mentality was right. Losing is not an option. In my loss to Amir, it wasn’t anything that he necessarily did to make me lose. All the losses that I’ve had I think I could have just as easily won those fights. This is a mental game, and I wasn’t there mentally for those fights.”

Thirty-three-year-old Martinez is on a losing streak as well. He has dropped three of his last four fights, to Jessie Vargas in 2012, Josesito Lopez in 2014, and Robert Guerrero in his last fight. But he succeeded in dropping The Ghost, himself somewhat diminished, when they fought in June and lost a disputed split decision.

“It felt good to knock down Guerrero because everyone underestimates my power,” says Martinez. “I haven’t met one single person who didn’t think I won the Robert Guerrero fight. I believe I beat him, but that’s the past. It’s boxing and I’m ready to fight a way different type of fighter.

“I have to take care of Alexander. My style is to fight and hopefully he stands and exchanges with me. But if he doesn’t we have a good game plan to box him. We know he’s a boxer so I’m pretty sure that’s what we’ll see. We train to box or trade blows.”

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Alexander vs Martinz | Selby vs Montiel: PBC on ESPN Preview - Oct. 14, 2015



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  1. SweetScience 12:18am, 10/17/2015

    KB’s first comment hit the nail on the head.
    Final round, alexander’s trainer says he needs a KO, and the few flurries he mustered, sounded like tick tacks hitting a window, thrown from a sidewalk, by a lil kid on mischief night. If that.
    He may have somehow won this though, if he had remained the “smart” fighter he renowned himself as, in the pre-fight interviews. He had a lead, but not only did he not have a punch, he walked right into the opposite of a game plan. That was the odd part.

  2. SweetScience 07:12pm, 10/15/2015

    KB’s first comment hit the nail on the head.
    Final round, alexander’s trainer says he needs a KO, and the few flurries he mustered, sounded like tick tacks hitting a window, thrown from a sidewalk, by a lil kid on mischief night. If that.
    He may have somehow won this though, if he had remained the “smart” fighter he renowned himself as, in the pre-fight interviews. He had a lead, but not only did he not have a punch, he walked right into the opposite of a game plan. That was the odd part.

  3. KB 12:38pm, 10/15/2015

    When a fighters says “he can’t pull the trigger,” that’s a sure sign that he is in the early stages of a dangerous period for him and he needs to get out. The disconnect between the intent (brain) and the actual (punches) is a sign that potential brain issues might be looming. Neurologists have looked at this and I totally agree with their finding. The same thing happened to De La Hoya when he fought Forbes and then he got slaughtered by Pac. At least he had the good sense to get out, If not being able to turn the trigger becomes a pattern, get out.

    Hmm I just might do a blog on this.

  4. Clarence George 06:20am, 10/15/2015

    Completely agree.  At the very least, that performance brought whole new meaning to “off night.”  But I suspect that the proverbial fork can be stuck in his career.  Didn’t at all understand Teddy Atlas and the fans at home awarding round after round to Alexander.  Based on what, his complete ineffectuality?  But kudos to trainer Kevin Cunningham for speaking truth to his fighter’s non-existent effort.  Wonder what happened there.  It was as though Alexander was hit with crippling depression just as the first bell rang.

  5. KB 05:52am, 10/15/2015

    Alexander is as shot as an old Ford pickup

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