EXCLUSIVE: Wilder vs. Fury Rules Meeting (with Video)

By Caryn A. Tate on December 1, 2018
EXCLUSIVE: Wilder vs. Fury Rules Meeting (with Video)
“The fans didn’t show up to watch me disqualify a fighter. They came to watch a fight.”

Getting the chance to pull back the curtain and see some of what goes on behind the scenes prior to a major fight card is a rare treat…

LOS ANGELES, California—As a fight fan, getting the chance to pull back the curtain and see some of what goes on behind the scenes prior to a major fight card is a rare treat.

On Friday, November 30, I had the rare opportunity to observe the California State Athletic Commission rules meeting with representatives of the fighters competing on the Deontay Wilder vs. Tyson Fury card. The event will take place this evening, December 1, at Staples Center in Los Angeles, California.

Veteran referee Jack Reiss, who is officiating the main event between Wilder and Fury, conducted the rules meeting. Also present were various other California State Athletic Commission officials, including other referees who will work the card.

California oversees more combat sports events (boxing and MMA) than any other state in the nation. It was clear from the thoughtfulness, preparation, and organization put into this event. A few other states even had athletic commission representatives present for this meeting, to learn from an expert commission in California.

The state has taken great strides to prioritize fighter safety by focusing on dangerous weight-cutting, discussed in detail in my interview with California State Athletic Commission Executive Officer Andy Foster back in July.

One of the best things about the experienced commission and its officials, though, is the fact that they “don’t go exactly by the letter of the law. [They] go by the spirit of the law,” as Jack Reiss said himself in the below video I shot. What he means by that is they strive to do what’s best for the sport, its fans, and its fighters, rather than strictly adhering to what is written on paper as far as the rules are concerned. An example Reiss lays out is, hypothetically, if a fighter gets knocked out of the ring (for which he has 20 seconds to get back into the ring, or else he’s disqualified) and he’s making a legitimate effort to get back in but is held up by fans or other people in the audience, and he’s struggling to get back up on the apron at 17 seconds, the referee would allow the fighter a reasonable amount of time, even if he wasn’t back in the ring at exactly 20 seconds.

Any fan of the sport, or really fairness in general, can appreciate this mentality. It’s simply the right thing to do. And Reiss is exactly right when he says, “The fans didn’t show up to watch me disqualify a fighter [unnecessarily]. They came to watch a fight.”

Enjoy the exclusive videos below.

Part 1: https://youtu.be/QPk3uiFruRo
Part 2: https://youtu.be/0alvRgAcHXI

Check out more of Caryn’s work at http://www.CarynATate.com and follow her on Twitter@carynatate

Follow us on Twitter@boxing_com to continue the discussion

EXCLUSIVE: Deontay Wilder vs. Tyson Fury Rules Meeting Pt 1



EXCLUSIVE: Deontay Wilder vs. Tyson Fury Rules Meeting Pt 2



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  1. Lucas McCain 11:42am, 12/01/2018

    Grateful to have these handy.  Reiss has been impressive in the past for the clarity of his judgment and his explanations.  He would be a great asset to a TV-broadcast team as well.

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